unbake your cake

小さい子どもが母親を「ママ」と呼ぶことは、英語だけじゃなくて様々な言語にある。Wikipediaに30ヶ国語の例が挙げられているが、万国共通ともいわれる。

Small children call their mother 'mama' not only in English but in lots of languages. Wikipedia lists thirty examples, but there are those who say that 'mama' is universal.


流行の説によると赤ん坊はまだ言葉を覚えていない時期から口と舌の動かし方を試しているときは一番発音しやすい音は/m/と/a/を含むという。そしてよく同じ音を繰り返して発するのでランダムにでも「マーマー」を発音する。

A prevailing theory is that, when babies have still not acquired language, they tend to work their mouths and tongues, creating sounds without meaning. The easiest sounds to produce include /m/ and /a/.


だがそのマーマーという音に「母」という意味をつけるのは赤ん坊ではなく周りの大人たち。マーマーと発音したらお母さんが反応してくれる。やっぱり反応は言語の元。

But it's adults, not babies, who assign the meaning of 'mother' to the sound maa maa. When the baby says 'maa maa' the mother reacts, and reaction is the basis of language.


一つの面白い例外は日本語だ。日本人の子どもはお母さんのことをよく「ママ」と呼ぶが、西洋からの外来語とされているね。(喃語から生まれるとされる「ママ」と違って、和語である「おかあさん」は子どもに発音しづらくてよく「おかあしゃん」とか言うね。)

One interesting case is that of Japanese. Japanese kids do call their mothers "mama", but this is regarded as a loan word from the West. (In contrast to the theorized origins of 'mama' in baby babble, the Japanese word 'o-kaa-san' is actually difficult for some small children to pronounce: they'll say 'o-kaa-shan' instead.)


でも「マンマ」という、ほぼ音韻が変わらない幼児言葉はあるね。これはお母さんじゃなくて、お母さんなどがくれる食べ物のことを意味するね。

But the word 'mamma', pronounced essentially the same, is a native bit of Japanese baby-talk that means not mother but food.


日本語の場合は意味の無い喃語である「マーマー」に対する母の反応は、自分のことが示されたように反応するんじゃなくて、食べ物が頼まれたように反応するね。その反応を見て赤ん坊は「マンマ」が食べ物を示すことを覚える。

It happens that in Japan, when babies produce the meaningless sounds 'maa maa', mothers react not as if their name has been called, but as if food has been requested. Thus, babies learn that 'mamma' means food.


このように日本人の親は食べ物という意味を「マンマ」に定める。(他国の親が定めたのと異なった意味だね。)

In this way, the Japanese language has assigned a meaning to 'mama' that differs from the meaning found in much of the rest of the world.